Marissa Mayer and The New Yahoo Employee Policy

Marrisa Mayer is absolutely right that real and meaningful relationships cannot be built purely from behind computer screens, via email, or over the phone. I don’t care what anyone says about the proliferation of technology and the ease-of-access it has provided for an increasingly mobile workforce, and it has, but it is still not close to being a substitute for face-to-face contact and the casual in-person encounters in lunch rooms or other parts of an office that form the intangibles of building human relationships.

I admit that people can be extremely efficient working remotely. It is easy to interact with various departments, have meetings over Skype and pretty much complete every task you need to, in order fulfill your job responsibilities. I also know many companies today are entirely virtual, and are thriving, but I bet even their CEO’s will admit that with more money (or much lower travel costs) they too would want their employees to meet more often, in-person. Ultimately, every company leader realizes that you cannot create that highly intangible yet extremely valuable thing we call “culture.” Corporations that have it feel more familiar, warmer and more like a home away from home for employees. They provide a common purpose, and those that do it better, create a sense of belonging to a tribe.  Just think about the amount of time we all spend working …

Here the rub; you simply cannot build meaningful relationships with people you have never sat across the table from, shared a latte with or broken bread with. A very wise CEO once told me that “everything that happens after 6pm is far more important than what transpires during the workday; this is where the magic happens.” He was absolutely right. It is during these moments; when you share the experience of having faced an abusively irate client, discuss the dressing down your boss got in front of you, or have a colleague offer to do something for you, so you can leave early, because they overheard it was you anniversary– these are the things that form the bonds that make up the intangible glue of real relationships. And these moments only transpire when you let your hair down, share a laugh, throw out a random idea based on something you just overheard, or because someone confessed a problem they were facing over lunch. Try taking your finance guy out for a coffee and ask him what he thinks of your latest project, and you will start to understand what I mean.

So while Ms. Mayer was right to bring people back into the office, it seems she may have relied a little too heavily on data to drive he decision and therefore failed miserable on how she executed Yahoo’s new policy (source: Business Insider). As much as I have talked about the virtues of being in the office, I feel equally that there needs to be a balance. People should be able to work from home a few days a week, and this is where technology has provided the ability to do it seamlessly (just not all the time). It should not be one or the other. If I were Ms. Mayer, I would have made it mandatory to be in the office every day for the first six months, for new hires, and then three days a week after that.

The most ironic thing about Ms. Mayer’s approach is that while she may have used data to inform and even make her decision, she clearly needs to learn that she also needs the human touch when executing and implementing policies across the organisation; especially when her objective is try and get people to build better inter-personal relationships.

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One thought on “Marissa Mayer and The New Yahoo Employee Policy

  1. I wonder how present she is with her employees–gee could that be the problem? I don’t know how executives expect great things from employees when they are not active in their lives and do not put any effort into caring about employees or how their leadership and how they act can not only influence but be instrumental in accomplishing the company’s goal as a cohesive group.

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